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  Knowing how to write a CV for internship in Kenya is not a task you should take lightly because this is what will determine whether or not you get a job. In this article check out how to go about writing a CV for internships. Tips for writing an Impressive CV for Internships   1. Demonstrate Interest You can demonstrate interest in the company or industry by highlighting the experiences you have gained through part time work, voluntary work or relevant personal hobbies. Of course these skills should be relevant to the internship position you are applying for. 2. Highlight Your Ability To Work In A Team As an intern, you will most likely be expected to work in a team so when it comes to how to write a CV for internship in Kenya, you need to show that you can do this.This can be done by showing your ability to work as a team through group projects in university or during your industrial attachment.   How to Write a CV for Internship in Kenya   1. Contact Information This is where you indicate your contact details from emails, phone numbers. You need to ensure that your details are up to date and you can be reached through them. 2. Professional Summary This is basically a summary of your work experience. You need to ensure that it somehow matches the position you are applying for and it highlights your skills in a way that makes you the perfect candidate for the job. 3. Key Skills and Competences This is the section where you list your strongest skills and experiences that make you stand out from the rest of the applicants. You can use skills you have acquired through your attachment or any other relevant position. 4. Education Qualifications List the degrees or diplomas you are working on or have earned, starting with your most current. Include the major, any minors, your graduation date and the school’s name, city and county. List courses that are relevant to the internship to show you have specific knowledge. 5. Professional Experience  In this section list each job title, company name, dates of employment and a list describing your duties and responsibilities. Use action verbs such as “developed,” “implemented” and “organized” to start each entry. To keep the CV concise and relevant, only include jobs that pertain to the internship. 6. Key Achievement Use this section to show the recruiter what you have achieved which is what will prove that you are indeed the best candidate for the job. 7. Referees You are required to provide at least 3 referees of you can. They should be people you have worked with directly if you have work experience or even a lecturer.     SAMPLE CV for internship     Forename Surname | X Graduate Location: xxxxxxx Telephone: xxxxxxxxxxx Email: xxxxxxxxxxxxx Professional profile Provide a summary of your abilities including detail on the skills and knowledge you have to offer employers, including your educational achievements (especially your ongoing degree), expected grades, courses and projects. Expand on industry specific knowledge and the transferable workplace skills you have gained throughout your degree such as communication, teamwork, organisation, planning, IT skills etc. Try to relate all of your attributes towards the internships you are applying for and give some indication of your interest and passion for the field you are applying to.   Placements & projects Tip: To compensate for your lack of experience, fill this section with plenty of examples of skills that could be applied in the workplace by detailing any impressive projects (from in or outside of university) or work placements you have undertaken. mmm yyyy - mmm yyyy                Project/placement                                                          Outline Give a summary of the project/placement explaining the overall goal and what your involvement was   Key Responsibilities •             Detail all of your responsibilities and showcase as much of your skills and knowledge as possible •             Use professional language and show how your duties impact the business where possible •             Try to highlight skills and knowledge from your degree and show how you apply them •             Include subject-matter knowledge from your degree and transferable skills like communication, teamwork, planning etc.   Key Achievements •             If possible, try to add some impressive achievements you’ve made that have had a big impact on the employer or a customer/client mmm yyyy - mmm yyyy                Project/placement   Education & qualifications              University name – Dates attended (from – to) o             Degree subject – Classification Add some detail on modules, specialisms, projects, papers etc.              College name – Dates attended (from – to) o             Qualification – Grade o             Qualification – Grade o             Qualification – Grade              School name – Dates attended (from – to) o             Qualification – Grade o             Qualification – Grade o             Qualification – Grade   Awards and recognition              Award and awarding body – Date achieved              Award and awarding body – Date achieved Interests Interests: List any interests that could be relevant to the roles you are applying for, or could generally be deemed as impressive, such as competing in contests, fundraising, volunteering, travelling or playing sports. REFEREES Please feel free to contact the under mentioned in regard to my competence, work ethic and performance 1. Name, Title, Contact address & email 2. Name, Title, Contact information 3. Name, Title, Contact. competitive ..
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  Talent is  a special, creative, or artistic aptitude   owned by an individual,Talent management is the science of using strategic human planning to improve ones value and to make it possible for one to reach their goals in life. we take a look at the few top people around that have used thires to better thier lives and aim to ignite yours too,... Music Sauti sol The band was formed in 2005 as an a cappella group by Baraza, Chimano and Savara, who had met at the Upper Hill High School and performed in Voices in the Light, a music group at the school.They then met guitarist Otieno, who attended Strathmore School, at the Alliance française in Nairobi, where they would frequent and decided to form Sauti "voice" and immediately wrote their first song, "Mafunzo ya Dunia", The band later added the Spanish word "Sol" (sun) to their name and formed Sauti Sol meaning "voices in the sun").In 2006, the band participated in the Spotlight on Kenyan Music competition, hosted by the Alliance française in Nairobi,the band has shown growth taking the top earning talent Bahati Kevin Bahati made headlines being the new kid in the entertainment industry, he came as a rising start with his hit single ‘Siku Ya Kwanza’ in late 2012. Now a gospel wiz kid Kevin Bahati has a life story that is often associated with people in the movies. As a man with talent, his humble nature and obvious talent put him in the big league. Having had a difficult childhood growing up Bahati has managed to outshine many musicians in the entertainment gospel industry to emerge as an outstanding musician that saw him win the groove awards 2014 award for best male gospel musician. Lady wanja Lady wanja whose real is Ejidiah Wanja is a kikuyu benga songstress. She is the sister to the late Queen Jane. She hails from Muranga county and has a a good number of fans that translate to her pay growing.   Radio Being a voice that can be heard by a constant and growing audience, takes alot more than just practice and content and hence we sorted after the topr voices that keep kenyans tuned in on their radios, and this is what we gathered 1.Maina Kageni The top earning radio presenter title goes to Maina kageni, of classic 105,commanding great audience all acroos the major cities in the country, his charisma has made him enjoy chemistry with many fans are always tuned in to listen every morning and this alones, earns him a sum of 1.8 M every month 2.Mwalimu King’ang’i Yes, you read it right, the co host of Maina kageni takes second place on this league, aside being a susccessful comedian on Tv, Daniel Ndambuki aka Churchill smiles always to the bank to collect a sum of 800,000 excluding the millions he gets from his comedy show   Mbusi From a one time trial of how his voice would do in radio,after bening a surbodinate staff at ghetto radio,the ghetto radio reage show opened an oppotubnity that was quickly noticed by radio jambo and hence called his fro a sum of 600,000 every month Thats not all.... Unlike the previous years, deejays are among the most paid entertainers in Kenya. Besides, they run the show in a field where their demand is becoming overwhelming by the day. But just who is taking the big cash home?   JOE MFALME He is a mix master by profession and one of Africa’s most sought after deejay. He charges $1,500 (Sh127, 500) to $2,000 (Sh170, 000) for regional and international tours, Sh40,000 to Sh50,000 for club gigs, a minimum of Sh50,000 for special occasions and as for colleges and universities shows, you might cough up Sh60,000 to Sh70,000 to get the party going. DJ MOH The 2013 Groove Award Deejay of the Year winner charges Sh100,000 to Sh150,000 per corporate event and Sh70,000 to Sh100,000 for colleges and universities events. His regional and international tours go for (Sh127, 500) to $2,000 (Sh170, 000) per show and Sh50,000 onwards for special occasions like weddings depending on the specific demands that the bride and groom have. DJ KALONJE Known as the king of matatu mixes, deejay Kalonje, has a quotation of Sh250,000 to Sh350,000 for corporate events, Sh100,000 to Sh150,000 for campus parties, Sh50,000 to Sh70,000 for club gigs within Nairobi and Sh80,000 onwards outside Nairobi with all other expenses paid for. For out of the country tours, he charges $2000 (Sh170, 000), all other expenses paid. DJ HASSAN Known for Homeboyz Radio and Homegrown TV shows, deejay Hassan charges above Sh100,000 for corporate gigs, Sh55,000 to Sh60,000 for campus parties, $1500 for tours exclusive of travel and other expenses, Sh50,000 for club gigs per night in Nairobi and above that for any outside Nairobi. While he rarely does special occasions he charges Sh60,000. Take note that this is only deejay service, exclusive of costs if he provides sound equipment. KRIS DARLING Known for his dancehall and reggae mixes, Dohty Family leader Kriss Darlin, charges ‘enough’. This depends on the event and place of performance. However, on the general quotation matters he doesn’t disclose such.“I don’t disclose that, it’s between the client and I,” he says. ..
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Their first jobs…. Having queries of how your career joumney might be,well we took a cream of the top finest personalities in kenya and compliled a brief of their career road to where they are now,..take a look.. 1.Prof  Anyang' Nyong'o Peter Anyang' Nyong'o (born 10 October 1945) is a Kenyan politician. He is the former Secretary-General of Orange Democratic Movement (the current acting Secretary General of the Orange Democratic Movement is Dr Agnes Zani). Professor Nyon'go was the acting party leader from March 11 until late May when Raila Odinga was in the United States[1] and was elected to the National Assembly of Kenya in the December 2007 parliamentary election, representing the Kisumu Rural Constituency.[2] He was the Minister for Medical Services and previously the Minister for Planning & National Development. He is currently serving as the Governor for Kisumu County after serving as the Senator from 2013 - 2017. Profession Career 1987 → 1991 : Head of Programs of African Academy of Sciences 1984 → 1986 : Associate Professor of University of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 1982 → 1984 : Visiting Research Officer of El Colegio De Mexico 1977 → 1981 : Lecturer and Senior Lecturer of University of Nairobi   2. Prof Paul Kiprono Chepkwony When Paul Kiprono Chepkwony was born in Ainamoi back in 1970, he perhaps had no idea he would scale the heights of success and even serve the society in a leadership position. There’s however no more linger of doubt as to that noble eventuality. Matter of fact, you can no longer simply refer to him as Paul Chepkwony…that would be an academic felony! So Prof. Paul Kiprono Chepkwony he is, thanks to his well-founded academic moulding at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology. Welcome everybody, to our alumnus of the week, H.E the Governor of Kericho County, Prof. Paul Kiprono Chepkwony.   Prof. Paul Kiprono Chepkwony Job History 2009 – present: Associate Professor at Moi University 2004 – 2009: Senior Lecturer at Moi University 1999 – 2004: Lecturer at Moi University 1997 – 1999: Assistant Lecturer at JKUAT     3. Prof Kivutha Kibwana   Prof Kivutha Kibwana was born in 1954 in Mwanyani, a remote part located in Nzaui District, Makueni County.He studied at Nduundune Primary School.[4] He later attended Machakos School (1969-1973) for his O’ and A’ Levels. He obtained a Bachelor degree in Law (Upper Second Class Honours) from the University of Nairobi in 1976 and a Masters of Law. He also went to University of London and George Washington University. He graduated from Harvard University in June 1984.[5]   Prof Kivutha Kibwana Job History 1977 – 2002:Associate Professor of University of Nairobi August 1993 – August 1995: Dean, Faculty of Law, of University of Nairobi February 1991-September 1992: Dean, Faculty of Law, of University of Nairobi December 1989-June 1992: Senior Lecturer of University of Nairobi May 1989-June 1989: Chairman of Department of private law September 1977-February 1989: Lecturer of University of Nairobi     4. Prof Kithure Kindiki    Prof Kithure Kindiki  Biography Kithure Kindiki (Prof. Abraham Kithure Kindiki) was born in 1973 in Irunduni village in Mukothima Ward in Tharaka Nithi County. He is currently the senator for Tharaka Nithi county and the Leader of majority in the senate.   Prof Kithure Kindiki Job History In April, 2008, He had been appointed Secretary of Cohesion in the Justice Ministry at a salary of Ksh. 500,000, but complained there was no political will to address the huge challenges facing the country at the time, including the resettlement of Internally Displaced Persons. He resigned from the job “as a matter of principle” after only 100 days in office and went back to lecture at the University of Nairobi. Member of Academic Council on the United Nations System (ACUNS) Consultant of h e United Nations Development Program (UNDP) October 2000 – March 2001 : 2000 (October) to 2001 (March): Resettlement Consultant, Legal Unit/ Division of International Protection, UNHCR, Branch Office for South Africa, Pretoria. The functions of this post was to carry out legal protection work on behalf of refugees and asylum seekers in South Africa. It involves refugee status determination, advising refugees and asylum seekers on their rights under national and international law and recommending durable solutions for them on a case-by-case basis. Consultant of The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Started January 2006: Head, Department of Public Law & Senior Lecturer of International Law, University of Nairobi. 2004 → 2005 : Lecturer of Law, University of Nairobi 1999 → 2003 : Lecturer of Law, Moi University, Kenya. Teaching Undergraduate Law students the following courses: Public International Law, Human Rights Law, International Humanitarian Law, International Dispute Resolution.   5. Hon. Hellen Sambili  Hon. Hellen Sambili ( Hellen Hellen Jepkemoi Sambili) was born in 1959. She is the member of parliament for Mogotio constituency, Baringo county. She is a member of Kenya African National Union and a coalition member of Amani (Peace) Coalition.   Hon. Hellen Sambili Job History Started 2001: Founder Member of Service learning programme for Egerton University visiting students Started 2001: Member of Service learning programme for Egerton University visiting students Started 1993:Various teaching and administrative positions in the department of curriculum and instruction of Egerton University 2001 – 2005: Coordinator – Egerton university IOWA State linkage programme of Egerton University 1994 – 2005: Member of Egerton University senate. 1994 – 2001: Head of Department – Department of curriculum and instruction of Egerton University ..
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My name is Juliet Nila. A graduate from Moi University with a Bachelors of Arts in Linguistics, Media and Communication. I am currently working as a Sales Representative at Talent Board. This being my second week. I knew about Talent Board from a friend. The friend actually referred me to Alternate Doors where I met Ken Mambo who told me about the Talent Board platform. The platform enables you to upload your CV and based on your experience and area of study you apply for the job that suits. On the 25th October, I got a call from Talent Board inviting me for an interview for a job I had applied for back in August. I attended the interview. I was surprised it was so smooth. Talent Board Director who conducted the interview was so friendly, that despite my anxiety and nervousness for doing interviews, it felt like we were having a conversation. I was offered the job and here I am. My first day at Talent Board was just like any other first days. I was blank, confused, and eager to learn and start the job. I was given guidelines on how to make telesales using a call script and was also shown the different kinds of mails to send to clients who requested for the company profile. I made my first call which I fumbled of course and it got better and better with the more calls I made. Other than these, my job description requires me to contact Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises prospects, schedule a meeting to conduct sales visits, web conference and phone-DEMOS.  I would say, I had a hectic time hunting for a job but with Talent Board… It was That Easy.... Thank you. ..
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So, how familiar are you with different leave days in Kenya?   Leave Pending Retirement In order to adapt to the retirement environment, an employee proceeding on retirement will be entitled to thirty (30) days leave with pay inclusive of Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays in addition to the normal annual leave entitlement. This leave should be taken thirty (30) days preceding the effective date of retirement and should not be commuted for cash.   Maternity/Paternity Leave Female employees shall be entitled to ninety (90) calendar day’s maternity leave with full pay. In this regard no female employee shall forfeit her annual leave entitlement on account of having taken maternity leave. Male employees shall be entitled to ten (10) working days paternity leave with full pay during maternity confinement of their legal spouse. In this regard, it is clarified that in case of a male employee with more than one (1) spouse he will be entitle to paternity leave only in respect of the wife registered with NHIF contributor’s card and such leave shall be taken not more than once in a year. Special Leave The Employer may at her discretion, grant special leave for any purpose not covered by the categories of leave set out above. In granting such leave, the Employer shall take into account the frequency of such absences on employees University work. Compassionate Leave An employee desiring to take compassionate leave shall with prior arrangement with the Head of Department and approval of the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration) be granted upto a maximum of ten (10) working days in case of emergencies/dire needs relating to a member’s nuclear family. Such leave shall be taken during the emergency/dire need and not after.   Study Leave In all cases study leave applications shall be processed according to laid down University procedure. For employees studying outside the country they shall be paid 80% of the basic salary. For those leaving their families behind, they shall be paid full house allowance and 80% of basic salary. For those studying within Kenya they will be paid 100% basic salary and house allowance.     Sick Leave A member of staff who is prevented by illness from carrying out his/her duties is required to furnish a medical certificate signed by a qualified Medical Practitioner or use such other mode of communication to this effect within two consecutive working days of absence. A member of staff may be granted sick leave at the following rates in a calendar year subject to the following maximum;   On Full Pay Above five (5) years of Service – six (6) months Below five (5) years of Service – three (3) months Contract Staff – two (2) months   On Half Pay Above five (5) years of Service – six (6) months Below five (5) years of Service – three (3) months Contract Staff – two (2) months   Leave of Absence Upon request, employees shall be granted unpaid leave of absence when on secondment to public institutions or for personal reasons, on the recommendation of the Head of Department and approval of the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration). Provided that employees granted leave of absence for any reason other than secondment to public institutions, the period may not be more than two years.   Professional Attachment Leave (a) The employer considers that in the interest of both the Employer and members of staff it is desirable that members of staff should be released from their normal duties at intervals during their career to undertake professional attachment. (b) Professional attachment leave will be granted to members of staff on permanent terms only after completion of six years continuous service with the University from the date of appointment or since return from professional attachment. (c) Staff members wishing to go for such leave shall apply to the Vice Chancellor through their respective Deputy Vice Chancellors. (d) Professional leave shall be granted at the rate of Six (6) months after six (6) years of continuous service. (e) Professional leave will be granted on full pay plus other benefits.   Disembarkation leave A member of staff who has completed their course outside the Country shall be granted ten (10) working days leave upon return. ..
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Joining the likes of  New York City ,  Massachusetts , and a handful of other local governments, San Francisco passed a city ordinance barring companies from asking questions about a candidate’s salary history. Mayor Ed Lee signed the bill into law on July 19, 2017 with a plan to fully implement it by 2018. This legislation is designed to reduce the wage gap and help break the cycle for women who have historically been paid less than their male counterparts. Though San Francisco does come out ahead of the national average, women in the city still only earn  84 cents for every dollar  made by their male peers. This new law aims to shift the city closer to pay equality. Sponsored by Mark Farrell, a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, the bill was very well received by all members of the board. Though this legislation is meant to benefit women and minority candidates alike, there is some concern that employers will be able to find other ways of deciphering a candidate’s salary history. If candidates are asked about their desired salary, for example, women with lower salary histories might ask for a smaller amount than male applicants.   What this means for HR Regardless of potential loopholes, the new legislation reflects an ongoing national effort to close the wage gap. Whether or not this law impacts your company directly, it is wise to be proactive as more  equal pay legislation  continues to pass at the state and local levels. To get ahead of this trend you might consider implementing these practices suggested by the  National Women’s Law Center : Running equal pay audits Promoting pay transparency Eliminating salary negotiation   ..
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On the clock, or off the clock—that is the question. In other words, what actually counts as work? While it’s no secret that  wage-and-hour rules can be convoluted , the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)’s provisions here are surprisingly clear. For hourly or nonexempt employees, time spent doing even the most unassuming task could be considered compensable. Skimming work emails while on vacation? Check. Traveling to a conference? Maybe.   We’ve broken down the four most common scenarios where seemingly off the clock actions actually count as hours worked.   1. Training   Whether it’s an in-house training program or a requirement to attend an off-site lecture, learning and development opportunities generally count as compensable work. Luckily, the FLSA offers  an easy-to-use test  for determining when employers actually need to pay out.   For a training activity to not be considered working time, it must meet all of the following criteria:   Attendance is optional The activity is not directly related to the individual’s job The employee does not perform any of their regular duties during the activity The activity takes place outside of regular working hours  Still unclear? Here’s the gist: if you require employees to attend a training, webinar, or similar activity, attendance is generally considered work. Since even the slightest encouragement can be interpreted as a mandate, managers should always make it clear whether attendance is voluntary. This approach saves your HR and payroll teams from compliance issues, as well as employees from the disappointment of learning last night’s boring roundtable wasn’t compensable.   2. Travel   Sorry to disappoint you—a morning commute to the office doesn’t count as time worked. That being said, there are a number of occasions where the FLSA requires employers to pay-up for travel.   Working overtime trying to calculate overtime? Learn how technology makes managing employee hours simple.   If an employee is traveling at their employer’s direction during work hours (e.g., from jobsite to jobsite), that counts as time worked. Additionally, if an employee is commuting for a special one day assignment to another location, that time is also considered work, with one caveat: the employer is permitted to deduct the individual’s typical commute time from the sum. Here’s an example:   Example: Sarah works in New York City and typically has a 30 minute commute. Her employer has sent her to a special meeting in Albany. Each way, it takes 2½ hours for Sarah to make the meeting, amounting to 5 hours of total travel time. If the employer so chooses, it may deduct an hour from Sarah’s billable hours to account for her typical commute to and from work.   What about cases where travel spans multiple days? The rules are less intuitive here. Regardless of whether the travel falls on a usual workday, employers must compensate employees for time spent traveling during their usual working hours. If an employee typically works from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, for example, they’d need to be paid for any travel that takes place between those hours. In this instance, a flight lasting from 7:00 AM to 12:00 PM would result in 3 billable hours for travel.   Note that federal law does allow your company to set a separate rate of compensation for travel time, so long as it exceeds the minimum wage and the employee has consented to it. You can  learn more about those rules here .   3. Checking Emails   We’ve all heard how obsessively checking emails after work can contribute to burnout. Last year, France even went as far as to enact a law protecting the  “right to disconnect .” When dealing with nonexempt workers, though, it's much more than a work-life-balance concern. Something as seemingly harmless as skimming work emails on vacation, believe it or not, poses serious compliance risks.   Exempt or nonexempt? Discover how Namely's managed services can help you answer HR’s toughest questions.   Federal regulations define employment as to “ suffer or permit to work ”—a broad definition that means any work, even if not expressly requested, is still considered payable. In short, an employee checking emails on his or her own time is legally considered compensable. Additionally, any form of after-hours correspondence, whether it be in-person or electronic (phone calls and texting count, too) related to work should be paid for.   There are number of policy approaches HR can take to avoid payroll compliance issues later on. First, be sure to remind nonexempt workers during onboarding that they should not be working off the clock without prior approval from their manager. If you don’t have this point included in your handbook already, strongly consider adding it.   It’s not just nonexempt behavior you’ll need to supervise, though. Managers sometimes inadvertently invite off the clock work by sending after-hours correspondence. Train managers to refrain from sending emails or making calls outside of business hours or during an individual’s vacation. While advocates of “ work-life integration ” may balk at the idea, coaching managers to clearly delineate work and personal time can trickle down and positively affect nonexempt employee behavior.   4. Lunch Sorry to spoil your appetite: while the FLSA doesn’t require employers to offer lunch (states and cities have filled that role), it has strict provisions for those who do. Call it the “20 minute rule”—if a break lasts 5-20 minutes, it must be considered compensable time. Anything more than that, and the break is considered a “ bona fide meal period ” under DOL rules and doesn’t need to be paid for.   The above covers what employers need to know at the federal level, but keep in mind that states and cities often have their own, more stringent provisions.  In Massachusetts , for example, employers are required to provide workers with a 30 minute meal break for shifts lasting over six hours. In cases where federal and state laws contradict, you’ll need to take a different approach— read about that here . As the old adage goes, “time is money.” When it comes to overtime compliance, time spent doing things we don’t typically consider work (like traveling or even cleaning up our inbox) is technically still compensable. Knowing this matters more than ever before. The number of wage-and-hour lawsuits filed per year has ballooned in the last decade and a half, going from just 1,935 filed in 2000 to 8,300 in 2016— a 330 percent increase .   Don’t find your company in the headlines. Regularly audit overtime classifications and continually remind nonexempt workers of what counts as hours worked. You’ll save yourself, and your company, from a payroll compliance nightmare down the road. ..
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Workplace bullying has become a hot topic nationwide, and for good reason. Research shows that  20 percent of U.S. workers have personally experienced it , and nearly two thirds are aware of it happening in their workplace.   Even with public awareness at an all-time high, state and local lawmakers have been slow to respond. Despite the efforts of anti-bullying and labor advocates, not one state has passed legislation addressing workplace bullying directly. That’s not for want of trying, however—in the last decade, nearly 30 state legislatures have taken up anti-bullying measures.   We’ll break down what has been proposed so far, and how some existing federal and state laws might offer protections to victims already.   Healthy Workplace Bills   Lawmakers across the country have sponsored bills to address bullying or “abusive conduct,” as legally defined. These “healthy workplace” bills vary slightly from state to state, but they all generally share the same model and protections. Why? These proposals borrow from language already drafted by the  Healthy Workplace Campaign , a grassroots movement that dates back to 2001. Over 100 versions of the group’s bill have been introduced at various levels of government.   The bills generally provide the following: A legal definition of an abusive work environment An avenue for victims to file suit against an employer or individual colleague Retrieval of lost wages, benefits, and legal fees as a result of abusive conduct Protection from adverse action for victims or individuals who participate as witnesses in a bullying investigation A recent example of a bill in Massachusetts can be found here.  These proposals sometimes offer additional protections to employers, by going as far as requiring that alleged victims receive an evaluation from a medical or mental health professional. Additionally, the laws do not empower state agencies to investigate or litigate workplace bullying, instead deferring to the affected individuals and their own private, legal counsel.   Title VII and Anti-Harassment Laws   While bullying has yet to be legally addressed at a broad level, employers must always be mindful of existing federal and state anti-discrimination laws. This is particularly true when abusive conduct intersects with a protected trait, as an employer could be held liable under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).   Under federal law, companies cannot discriminate against employees for their race, color, national origin, gender, religion, disability, age (if the employee is at least 40 years old), and citizenship. In a number of jurisdictions,  like the District of Columbia , sexual orientation and gender identity are also considered protected traits. Teasing or bullying that invokes any of these characteristics, if left unchecked, invites the ire of enforcement agencies like the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Even if members of management are not involved in the abusive conduct, employer inaction can be legally interpreted as fostering a hostile work environment.   Additionally, a number of states require employees or managers to participate in anti-harassment training. In Connecticut, businesses with 50 or more employees must enroll managers in sexual harassment training within their first 6 months of employment. Maine employers with headcounts of 15 or more need to offer anti-harassment training to  all  employees within their first year at the company. California, seldom late to the party,  has its own robust requirement  for supervisors: a minimum of two hours of state-approved training, once every two years. The Golden State goes even further, by requiring that employers have a written anti-harassment policy and complaints process.   Though states have yet to act decisively on workplace bullying, it may be just a matter of time. All 50 states have laws protecting schoolchildren, most of which mandate that districts implement policies and practices to address bullying. While these laws’ efficacy  has been brought into question , their proliferation confirms bullying’s rise as a social issue. In Washington,  first lady Melania Trump  has said that addressing cyberbullying in particular is one of her highest priorities.   While only time will tell whether workplace bullying is legislatively addressed, HR teams can and should take steps to stamp it out today. Read  Namely’s guide to tackling workplace bullying  and learn how to foster a more civil (and productive) workplace. ..
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What do companies like SeatGeek, Metromile, and Entelo all have in common? Aside from being named to Glassdoor’s  Best Places to Work 2017 , they all have that signature startup culture so many larger companies try to replicate. You know the one: trendy offices, catered lunches, and weekly happy hours. But, as is the nature with most startups, growth is the ultimate goal—and it happens rapidly. As the business scales, it can be tricky to stay true to the fun-loving, collaborative culture startups and small businesses take so much pride in. The Alternative Board’s  2016 Small Business Pulse Survey  found that while 93% of the entrepreneurs surveyed agreed on the relationship between promoting company culture and boosting employee productivity and creativity, they weren’t all in agreement about how to create and maintain that company culture. As your business grows, try these strategies to keep your company culture intact at every stage:   1. Build a Sturdy Foundation While ping-pong tables, beer kegs, and free lunches are all great things to have, these perks alone can’t solidify your company culture. If that’s all you have, your cultural values will get lost as your business grows. To maintain the tight-knit culture that you and your employees know and love, incorporate those cultural norms into your company’s core values. For example, weekly catered lunches may be a result of your employee wellness initiative. Or a team happy hour may reflect the company’s commitment to work-life balance. In both examples, while the actual perk may shift as you grow, the underlying values will stand the test of time. Connect these elements of your company culture to deep-rooted organizational values in order to build a much stronger foundation for your growing company.   2. Hire for Culture Fit Just because you’re looking to build out your team doesn’t mean you have to lose the culture established by its founding members. Instead, let that culture inspire your hiring process. Take culture fit into consideration when interviewing candidates to ensure the person you bring on board will embrace and contribute to the existing company culture. So how can you make sure you hire a good cultural fit, exactly? During the job interview, ask a few open-ended questions on what the candidate considers an ideal workplace. How do they work best? What did they like or dislike about their previous work environment? What do they plan to bring to your company culture? In addition to the questions you ask, culture fit can also be easily determined by involving other team members in the interview process. This way, you’re able to see how the candidate interacts with current employees.   3. Keep Your Friends Close and Your Employees Closer With more growth comes more responsibility for HR, so it can be easy to put company culture on the backburner. But in order to maintain that small company feel, you need to keep your friends close and your employees closer. As you grow it can become harder to interact with everyone. If you find that you have grown to a point where voices are being lost, introduce initiatives that bring everyone together. Try changing your office seating arrangement on a regular basis, scheduling monthly company meetings, and organizing regular social opportunities to help employees break away from their desk and form connections with peers.   4. Keep the Culture Alive Every Single Day Last, but certainly not least, strive to do something each day to keep your company culture alive. It can be as simple as brainstorming with employees in the office break room, eating lunch outside of the office, or playing a quick game of ping-pong in between conference calls. The key is to make time to be an active participant in the company culture you and your employees created. When employees see you take time out of your day to embrace and promote your company culture, they’ll do the same. Every little bit counts.   Learn how you can use HR technology to support your company culture as you grow.     ..
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CEOs, and company leadership in general, set the stage for a company’s culture and values. In the best workplaces, CEOs lead by example and embody personality traits that help a company achieve its mission. As you bring new talent on board, it’s important to make sure that your vision for a successful team aligns with that of leadership. This ensures that you are growing the company around a unified set of central values—helping you effectively scale in the long run. We asked 10 CEOs to share what personality traits they look for in candidates. Here’s what they had to say:   1. Kindness “Kindness is a value I work to embody in my own life, and it’s something I look for when hiring people at all levels of the organization. Successful employees must be driven to succeed, but the two traits aren’t mutually exclusive. I want to see that candidates are genuinely kind—that they’re the type of person who will help out a teammate, bring positive energy to the office, and be someone everyone wants to work alongside.” - Matt Straz,  Namely   2. Fearlessness "I look for fearlessness. By my own admission, I'm a pretty intense figure. I look for someone who will challenge my beliefs, thoughts, and mission. I like to do my homework on the interviewee. I read about a point of contention in education, previous job history, etc. I then stage an interview question wherein I take an opposing side, and I want to see if they'll stick up for what they believe in and challenge me on it, even if it is something very subtle. As the CEO, when I am directly involved in a hiring, I'm likely going to be working very closely with that person. I want to ensure that they will always be direct and forward with me." - Jan Bednar,  ShipMonk   3. Follow Through “This goes hand in hand with organization, but knowing that a team member will take the ball and not only run with it, but also make sure that they run it across the goal line is key. Way too many people will start something but get stuck and not finish it when they hit one or two obstacles. I really look for people with strong follow through, who will not stop until they complete the goal. - Grayson Lafrenz,  Power Digital Marketing   4. Desire to Learn “One of the most important traits [I] look for is [an] overall willingness and desire to learn. People who are eager to learn are generally always up for a new challenge, don't mind not knowing what may be thrown at them, and are always looking for ways to improve themselves. Eager learners are often also very innovative and self-sufficient, allowing them to develop new, more efficient ways to complete tasks. Given these types of employees are generally excited to wear many hats and will work hard on whatever is thrown at them, they are invaluable to any company.” - Sacha Ferrandi,  Source Capital Funding, Inc .   5. Enthusiasm “I want a candidate to be enthusiastic during the interview. I’d love for them to be enthusiastic about joining our team (with valid reasons provided), but also about their work or a hobby. I want to see that this person has a passion for something and has that willingness to put in effort for something they care about. Enthusiasm is great for customer service and is also a telltale quality of someone who usually has good intrapersonal skills. - Matt Ham,  Computer Repair Doctor   6. Team Players “We hire team players. We screen for ‘team player-ness’ by asking questions about their work ethic, examples of how they contributed at prior companies, and willingness to go above and beyond. We look to hire people who engage, who ‘get it’ when we explain the way our company works, and who earnestly show their ability to offer that approach to work.” - Deborah Sweeney,  MyCorporation   7. Collegiate Athletics “One interesting trait that I’ve found to be a good predictor of workplace success is if the candidate has participated in collegiate athletics at any level. Since they have received hours of coaching, they are better at processing constructive feedback to improve performance. In addition, they are usually good communicators since they have worked closely in a team environment. They thrive on competition and are accustomed to long term discipline to achieve a goal. Finally, they tend to have good time management skills since they learned to juggle training and academics.” ..
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