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Joining the likes of  New York City ,  Massachusetts , and a handful of other local governments, San Francisco passed a city ordinance barring companies from asking questions about a candidate’s salary history. Mayor Ed Lee signed the bill into law on July 19, 2017 with a plan to fully implement it by 2018. This legislation is designed to reduce the wage gap and help break the cycle for women who have historically been paid less than their male counterparts. Though San Francisco does come out ahead of the national average, women in the city still only earn  84 cents for every dollar  made by their male peers. This new law aims to shift the city closer to pay equality. Sponsored by Mark Farrell, a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, the bill was very well received by all members of the board. Though this legislation is meant to benefit women and minority candidates alike, there is some concern that employers will be able to find other ways of deciphering a candidate’s salary history. If candidates are asked about their desired salary, for example, women with lower salary histories might ask for a smaller amount than male applicants.   What this means for HR Regardless of potential loopholes, the new legislation reflects an ongoing national effort to close the wage gap. Whether or not this law impacts your company directly, it is wise to be proactive as more  equal pay legislation  continues to pass at the state and local levels. To get ahead of this trend you might consider implementing these practices suggested by the  National Women’s Law Center : Running equal pay audits Promoting pay transparency Eliminating salary negotiation   ..
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On the clock, or off the clock—that is the question. In other words, what actually counts as work? While it’s no secret that  wage-and-hour rules can be convoluted , the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)’s provisions here are surprisingly clear. For hourly or nonexempt employees, time spent doing even the most unassuming task could be considered compensable. Skimming work emails while on vacation? Check. Traveling to a conference? Maybe.   We’ve broken down the four most common scenarios where seemingly off the clock actions actually count as hours worked.   1. Training   Whether it’s an in-house training program or a requirement to attend an off-site lecture, learning and development opportunities generally count as compensable work. Luckily, the FLSA offers  an easy-to-use test  for determining when employers actually need to pay out.   For a training activity to not be considered working time, it must meet all of the following criteria:   Attendance is optional The activity is not directly related to the individual’s job The employee does not perform any of their regular duties during the activity The activity takes place outside of regular working hours  Still unclear? Here’s the gist: if you require employees to attend a training, webinar, or similar activity, attendance is generally considered work. Since even the slightest encouragement can be interpreted as a mandate, managers should always make it clear whether attendance is voluntary. This approach saves your HR and payroll teams from compliance issues, as well as employees from the disappointment of learning last night’s boring roundtable wasn’t compensable.   2. Travel   Sorry to disappoint you—a morning commute to the office doesn’t count as time worked. That being said, there are a number of occasions where the FLSA requires employers to pay-up for travel.   Working overtime trying to calculate overtime? Learn how technology makes managing employee hours simple.   If an employee is traveling at their employer’s direction during work hours (e.g., from jobsite to jobsite), that counts as time worked. Additionally, if an employee is commuting for a special one day assignment to another location, that time is also considered work, with one caveat: the employer is permitted to deduct the individual’s typical commute time from the sum. Here’s an example:   Example: Sarah works in New York City and typically has a 30 minute commute. Her employer has sent her to a special meeting in Albany. Each way, it takes 2½ hours for Sarah to make the meeting, amounting to 5 hours of total travel time. If the employer so chooses, it may deduct an hour from Sarah’s billable hours to account for her typical commute to and from work.   What about cases where travel spans multiple days? The rules are less intuitive here. Regardless of whether the travel falls on a usual workday, employers must compensate employees for time spent traveling during their usual working hours. If an employee typically works from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, for example, they’d need to be paid for any travel that takes place between those hours. In this instance, a flight lasting from 7:00 AM to 12:00 PM would result in 3 billable hours for travel.   Note that federal law does allow your company to set a separate rate of compensation for travel time, so long as it exceeds the minimum wage and the employee has consented to it. You can  learn more about those rules here .   3. Checking Emails   We’ve all heard how obsessively checking emails after work can contribute to burnout. Last year, France even went as far as to enact a law protecting the  “right to disconnect .” When dealing with nonexempt workers, though, it's much more than a work-life-balance concern. Something as seemingly harmless as skimming work emails on vacation, believe it or not, poses serious compliance risks.   Exempt or nonexempt? Discover how Namely's managed services can help you answer HR’s toughest questions.   Federal regulations define employment as to “ suffer or permit to work ”—a broad definition that means any work, even if not expressly requested, is still considered payable. In short, an employee checking emails on his or her own time is legally considered compensable. Additionally, any form of after-hours correspondence, whether it be in-person or electronic (phone calls and texting count, too) related to work should be paid for.   There are number of policy approaches HR can take to avoid payroll compliance issues later on. First, be sure to remind nonexempt workers during onboarding that they should not be working off the clock without prior approval from their manager. If you don’t have this point included in your handbook already, strongly consider adding it.   It’s not just nonexempt behavior you’ll need to supervise, though. Managers sometimes inadvertently invite off the clock work by sending after-hours correspondence. Train managers to refrain from sending emails or making calls outside of business hours or during an individual’s vacation. While advocates of “ work-life integration ” may balk at the idea, coaching managers to clearly delineate work and personal time can trickle down and positively affect nonexempt employee behavior.   4. Lunch Sorry to spoil your appetite: while the FLSA doesn’t require employers to offer lunch (states and cities have filled that role), it has strict provisions for those who do. Call it the “20 minute rule”—if a break lasts 5-20 minutes, it must be considered compensable time. Anything more than that, and the break is considered a “ bona fide meal period ” under DOL rules and doesn’t need to be paid for.   The above covers what employers need to know at the federal level, but keep in mind that states and cities often have their own, more stringent provisions.  In Massachusetts , for example, employers are required to provide workers with a 30 minute meal break for shifts lasting over six hours. In cases where federal and state laws contradict, you’ll need to take a different approach— read about that here . As the old adage goes, “time is money.” When it comes to overtime compliance, time spent doing things we don’t typically consider work (like traveling or even cleaning up our inbox) is technically still compensable. Knowing this matters more than ever before. The number of wage-and-hour lawsuits filed per year has ballooned in the last decade and a half, going from just 1,935 filed in 2000 to 8,300 in 2016— a 330 percent increase .   Don’t find your company in the headlines. Regularly audit overtime classifications and continually remind nonexempt workers of what counts as hours worked. You’ll save yourself, and your company, from a payroll compliance nightmare down the road. ..
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Workplace bullying has become a hot topic nationwide, and for good reason. Research shows that  20 percent of U.S. workers have personally experienced it , and nearly two thirds are aware of it happening in their workplace.   Even with public awareness at an all-time high, state and local lawmakers have been slow to respond. Despite the efforts of anti-bullying and labor advocates, not one state has passed legislation addressing workplace bullying directly. That’s not for want of trying, however—in the last decade, nearly 30 state legislatures have taken up anti-bullying measures.   We’ll break down what has been proposed so far, and how some existing federal and state laws might offer protections to victims already.   Healthy Workplace Bills   Lawmakers across the country have sponsored bills to address bullying or “abusive conduct,” as legally defined. These “healthy workplace” bills vary slightly from state to state, but they all generally share the same model and protections. Why? These proposals borrow from language already drafted by the  Healthy Workplace Campaign , a grassroots movement that dates back to 2001. Over 100 versions of the group’s bill have been introduced at various levels of government.   The bills generally provide the following: A legal definition of an abusive work environment An avenue for victims to file suit against an employer or individual colleague Retrieval of lost wages, benefits, and legal fees as a result of abusive conduct Protection from adverse action for victims or individuals who participate as witnesses in a bullying investigation A recent example of a bill in Massachusetts can be found here.  These proposals sometimes offer additional protections to employers, by going as far as requiring that alleged victims receive an evaluation from a medical or mental health professional. Additionally, the laws do not empower state agencies to investigate or litigate workplace bullying, instead deferring to the affected individuals and their own private, legal counsel.   Title VII and Anti-Harassment Laws   While bullying has yet to be legally addressed at a broad level, employers must always be mindful of existing federal and state anti-discrimination laws. This is particularly true when abusive conduct intersects with a protected trait, as an employer could be held liable under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).   Under federal law, companies cannot discriminate against employees for their race, color, national origin, gender, religion, disability, age (if the employee is at least 40 years old), and citizenship. In a number of jurisdictions,  like the District of Columbia , sexual orientation and gender identity are also considered protected traits. Teasing or bullying that invokes any of these characteristics, if left unchecked, invites the ire of enforcement agencies like the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Even if members of management are not involved in the abusive conduct, employer inaction can be legally interpreted as fostering a hostile work environment.   Additionally, a number of states require employees or managers to participate in anti-harassment training. In Connecticut, businesses with 50 or more employees must enroll managers in sexual harassment training within their first 6 months of employment. Maine employers with headcounts of 15 or more need to offer anti-harassment training to  all  employees within their first year at the company. California, seldom late to the party,  has its own robust requirement  for supervisors: a minimum of two hours of state-approved training, once every two years. The Golden State goes even further, by requiring that employers have a written anti-harassment policy and complaints process.   Though states have yet to act decisively on workplace bullying, it may be just a matter of time. All 50 states have laws protecting schoolchildren, most of which mandate that districts implement policies and practices to address bullying. While these laws’ efficacy  has been brought into question , their proliferation confirms bullying’s rise as a social issue. In Washington,  first lady Melania Trump  has said that addressing cyberbullying in particular is one of her highest priorities.   While only time will tell whether workplace bullying is legislatively addressed, HR teams can and should take steps to stamp it out today. Read  Namely’s guide to tackling workplace bullying  and learn how to foster a more civil (and productive) workplace. ..
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What do companies like SeatGeek, Metromile, and Entelo all have in common? Aside from being named to Glassdoor’s  Best Places to Work 2017 , they all have that signature startup culture so many larger companies try to replicate. You know the one: trendy offices, catered lunches, and weekly happy hours. But, as is the nature with most startups, growth is the ultimate goal—and it happens rapidly. As the business scales, it can be tricky to stay true to the fun-loving, collaborative culture startups and small businesses take so much pride in. The Alternative Board’s  2016 Small Business Pulse Survey  found that while 93% of the entrepreneurs surveyed agreed on the relationship between promoting company culture and boosting employee productivity and creativity, they weren’t all in agreement about how to create and maintain that company culture. As your business grows, try these strategies to keep your company culture intact at every stage:   1. Build a Sturdy Foundation While ping-pong tables, beer kegs, and free lunches are all great things to have, these perks alone can’t solidify your company culture. If that’s all you have, your cultural values will get lost as your business grows. To maintain the tight-knit culture that you and your employees know and love, incorporate those cultural norms into your company’s core values. For example, weekly catered lunches may be a result of your employee wellness initiative. Or a team happy hour may reflect the company’s commitment to work-life balance. In both examples, while the actual perk may shift as you grow, the underlying values will stand the test of time. Connect these elements of your company culture to deep-rooted organizational values in order to build a much stronger foundation for your growing company.   2. Hire for Culture Fit Just because you’re looking to build out your team doesn’t mean you have to lose the culture established by its founding members. Instead, let that culture inspire your hiring process. Take culture fit into consideration when interviewing candidates to ensure the person you bring on board will embrace and contribute to the existing company culture. So how can you make sure you hire a good cultural fit, exactly? During the job interview, ask a few open-ended questions on what the candidate considers an ideal workplace. How do they work best? What did they like or dislike about their previous work environment? What do they plan to bring to your company culture? In addition to the questions you ask, culture fit can also be easily determined by involving other team members in the interview process. This way, you’re able to see how the candidate interacts with current employees.   3. Keep Your Friends Close and Your Employees Closer With more growth comes more responsibility for HR, so it can be easy to put company culture on the backburner. But in order to maintain that small company feel, you need to keep your friends close and your employees closer. As you grow it can become harder to interact with everyone. If you find that you have grown to a point where voices are being lost, introduce initiatives that bring everyone together. Try changing your office seating arrangement on a regular basis, scheduling monthly company meetings, and organizing regular social opportunities to help employees break away from their desk and form connections with peers.   4. Keep the Culture Alive Every Single Day Last, but certainly not least, strive to do something each day to keep your company culture alive. It can be as simple as brainstorming with employees in the office break room, eating lunch outside of the office, or playing a quick game of ping-pong in between conference calls. The key is to make time to be an active participant in the company culture you and your employees created. When employees see you take time out of your day to embrace and promote your company culture, they’ll do the same. Every little bit counts.   Learn how you can use HR technology to support your company culture as you grow.     ..
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CEOs, and company leadership in general, set the stage for a company’s culture and values. In the best workplaces, CEOs lead by example and embody personality traits that help a company achieve its mission. As you bring new talent on board, it’s important to make sure that your vision for a successful team aligns with that of leadership. This ensures that you are growing the company around a unified set of central values—helping you effectively scale in the long run. We asked 10 CEOs to share what personality traits they look for in candidates. Here’s what they had to say:   1. Kindness “Kindness is a value I work to embody in my own life, and it’s something I look for when hiring people at all levels of the organization. Successful employees must be driven to succeed, but the two traits aren’t mutually exclusive. I want to see that candidates are genuinely kind—that they’re the type of person who will help out a teammate, bring positive energy to the office, and be someone everyone wants to work alongside.” - Matt Straz,  Namely   2. Fearlessness "I look for fearlessness. By my own admission, I'm a pretty intense figure. I look for someone who will challenge my beliefs, thoughts, and mission. I like to do my homework on the interviewee. I read about a point of contention in education, previous job history, etc. I then stage an interview question wherein I take an opposing side, and I want to see if they'll stick up for what they believe in and challenge me on it, even if it is something very subtle. As the CEO, when I am directly involved in a hiring, I'm likely going to be working very closely with that person. I want to ensure that they will always be direct and forward with me." - Jan Bednar,  ShipMonk   3. Follow Through “This goes hand in hand with organization, but knowing that a team member will take the ball and not only run with it, but also make sure that they run it across the goal line is key. Way too many people will start something but get stuck and not finish it when they hit one or two obstacles. I really look for people with strong follow through, who will not stop until they complete the goal. - Grayson Lafrenz,  Power Digital Marketing   4. Desire to Learn “One of the most important traits [I] look for is [an] overall willingness and desire to learn. People who are eager to learn are generally always up for a new challenge, don't mind not knowing what may be thrown at them, and are always looking for ways to improve themselves. Eager learners are often also very innovative and self-sufficient, allowing them to develop new, more efficient ways to complete tasks. Given these types of employees are generally excited to wear many hats and will work hard on whatever is thrown at them, they are invaluable to any company.” - Sacha Ferrandi,  Source Capital Funding, Inc .   5. Enthusiasm “I want a candidate to be enthusiastic during the interview. I’d love for them to be enthusiastic about joining our team (with valid reasons provided), but also about their work or a hobby. I want to see that this person has a passion for something and has that willingness to put in effort for something they care about. Enthusiasm is great for customer service and is also a telltale quality of someone who usually has good intrapersonal skills. - Matt Ham,  Computer Repair Doctor   6. Team Players “We hire team players. We screen for ‘team player-ness’ by asking questions about their work ethic, examples of how they contributed at prior companies, and willingness to go above and beyond. We look to hire people who engage, who ‘get it’ when we explain the way our company works, and who earnestly show their ability to offer that approach to work.” - Deborah Sweeney,  MyCorporation   7. Collegiate Athletics “One interesting trait that I’ve found to be a good predictor of workplace success is if the candidate has participated in collegiate athletics at any level. Since they have received hours of coaching, they are better at processing constructive feedback to improve performance. In addition, they are usually good communicators since they have worked closely in a team environment. They thrive on competition and are accustomed to long term discipline to achieve a goal. Finally, they tend to have good time management skills since they learned to juggle training and academics.” ..
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There is a lot of buzz around bullying these days—particularly in education and online—but the truth is bullying is much more prevalent across the professional world than you may have thought.  75% of employees  have either been a victim or witness of workplace bullying. The Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI)  defines workplace bullying  as a repeated, health-harming mistreatment of one or more persons by one or more perpetrators. This can be conduct that is threatening, humiliating, or intimidating, and it may take the form of interference with work or verbal abuse. It can be tricky for HR to find the best way to intervene and bring about a comfortable resolution to workplace bullying. For starters, it’s important to create a culture that encourages employees to come forward with any concerns. Here are three workplace bullying scenarios you may encounter and how to best approach them:   1. Peer-to-Peer Bullying When an employee reports a coworker who is bullying them, be sure to thoroughly investigate the situation before moving forward with a plan of action. Protecting the privacy of the target employee is crucial to building and maintaining a culture of trust.   Encourage employees to approach you with issues. While  HR is not the complaint department , workplace bullying should not be tolerated. Your employees must know they can entrust you with their workplace problems.  40% of employees  who are targets of workplace bullying never report it. If employees know that talking to HR will help bring about a healthier work environment, they will be more likely to come to you directly, rather than putting in notice once they’ve reached their limit. Make sure employees know that their issues remain confidential until you agree on a plan of action, and also offer professional support for coping with the situation in the meantime. Always thank the employee for bringing the situation to your attention—you never want someone to walk out of your office regretting their decision to come forward.   Get your facts straight. Speak with the managers of both employees about the accused employee’s performance, work style, and relationships with his or her peers. You may even want to take a little time to observe the accused employee to see if you notice any bullying tendencies. Document all of the information that you receive for your own record. Along the way, be transparent with the target employee on how you intend to investigate the situation.   Act and follow up. Once you have all of the facts, you can propose a strategy for resolution. Depending on the severity of the bullying, the steps already taken, and the target employee’s level of comfort, a solution could take a variety of forms. In some cases, both parties might benefit from a simple mediated conversation with HR and their managers. In more severe instances, the offender may need to be placed on a performance improvement plan until he or she is able to make a positive change. The situation is inherently sensitive, so whatever plan of action you ultimately decide to take, ensure the targeted employee is comfortable and fully on board. After the plan is implemented, be sure to follow up with the both employees and managers to see if there has been a change.   2. Manager to Employee Bullying According to the WBI,  72% of workplace bullies  are actually managers. This means that HR must be attuned to bad managerial practices and offer resources for successful employee management. The power dynamic in manager to employee bullying scenarios often keeps employees from reporting issues. Find ways to encourage employees to come to you with any problems they have regardless of rank, status, or pay grade.   Proactively train managers to be effective leaders. Oftentimes, bad management stems from a lack of training. Managers who pick favorites, don’t know how to communicate feedback effectively, or view their reports as lesser are not equipped to build strong teams or contribute to a thriving work environment. The best way to solve managerial bullying issues is by stopping it before it gets started. Introduce managers to core leadership values from their initial onboarding and lead ongoing development programs like  employee coaching . With these programs in place, it will be easier to help managers course-correct by drawing on trainings, rather than focusing on an employee complaint.   Validate employees when they come forward. Validating an employee who feels victimized by his or her manager is crucial in maintaining employee trust. The employee should walk away feeling like your ultimate goal is to find a solution that helps them feel comfortable in their work environment. Criticizing a superior can be intimidating, especially if the employee feels that it puts their job at risk. Sending out periodic anonymous surveys can open the lines of communication, and combat employee silence on issues they may face with management.   Work closely with managers to bring about change. While proactive training is ideal, some situations require reactive steps. Use survey results or anonymous employee feedback to work closely with managers on solutions to employee concerns. This could range from weekly 1:1s to group training sessions, or even a direct conversation with the manager and his or her direct report. As always, document any conversations, and follow up with employees after implementing a resolution.   3. Observed Bullying This might be the hardest scenario, as it’s not always clear when or how to intervene. You may witness an act of workplace bullying taking place in a common space, a meeting, or even as you walk by employee desks. In these situations it’s your role to lead by example and make a decision on the spot as to how to best handle it.   Assess the situation. Your approach to observed office bullying depends on the specific situation. For example, the middle of a meeting is not the place to call a leader out on his or her mistreatment of a fellow employee. You might instead, pull the leader aside after the meeting, bring it to his or her attention and suggest a possible remedy—such as a follow-up apology. In a more casual setting where you observe an instance of bullying, like the break room for example, it might be more appropriate to address the offender in the moment.   Follow up with the targeted employee. When you observe the situation firsthand, you can act on your own without jeopardizing the trust of the employee. You can speak from personal experience that the observed behavior is unacceptable. However, it doesn’t stop there—document the observed incident and follow up with the targeted employee to ensure that steps have been taken to resolve the issue and there have been no repeat instances. Bullying in the workplace calls on HR professionals to make sure that employees have a safe space to report conflict. Happy employees work hard, promote your brand, and stay for the long haul, so make sure you have the right policies in place to support them in a safe work environment. ..
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Everyone loves payday, but what about payroll processing day? That’s another story. Reconciling employee hours, updating W-4 withholdings, and navigating federal and state taxes can be a time consuming, error-prone process. Annually, U.S. businesses spend up to  80 hours (or two work weeks) on figuring out payroll taxes alone.   There’s a better way. By leveraging both  technology  and best practice, HR and payroll professionals can dramatically cut down the time spent making payday a reality. Follow these four tips to to achieve “instant payroll.”   1. Take an “All-in-One” Approach to Payroll Tech   At most companies, HR departments manage more than just talent acquisition or performance reviews. Payroll and benefits administration often falls under their purview as well. If your role is all-in-one, why shouldn’t your technology be? If you haven’t already, consider evaluating fully integrated platforms over disparate solutions.   When employee compensation, marital status, allowances, and elections all exist within the same system as payroll, you don’t need to waste time formatting import files or worse yet, manually entering data into payroll. When your system is self-service, that benefit is magnified—employees can update their personal or payment information themselves, so you don’t have to track them down on deadline day.   Time savings aside, it’s also significantly less expensive to use an integrated HR, payroll, and benefits system. To learn more about the benefits of the all-in-one approach,  read this overview from TechnologyAdvice .   2. Keep a Calendar   Keeping track of paydates, processing days, and IRS deadlines is no small feat. All of this information should be kept in a place that you and your team can easily reference. Whether you opt to use a digital calendar, traditional hard-copy planner, or even a team whiteboard, having all of these dates in one place makes it easier to plan ahead. Also be mindful of bank holidays, as those can often shift around your processing deadlines.   To get you started, below are some of the critical filing deadlines you’ll need to be mindful of. This list is accurate as of August, 2017:   January 31 - Last day to distribute W-2s and 1099-MISC forms to employees January 31 - Form 941 due (Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return) February 15 - Last day to request a new Form W-4 from exempt employees February 28 - Paper Form 1094-C and 1095-C are due March 2 - Last day to distribute 1095-C to employees March 31 - Deadline to submit electronic Form 1094-C and 1095-C April 18 - Tax Day (filing deadline for personal returns) April 30 - Form 941 due (Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return) July 31 - Form 941 due (Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return) October 31 - Form 941 due (Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return) Those are just some of the important dates you’ll need to be mindful of. Luckily for you, many of these, in addition to recurring processing deadlines and paydays, are likely already tracked by your payroll provider.   3. Invest in Time Tracking   Getting hourly or nonexempt workers across the payroll finish line has never been easy. Wrangling timesheets and reminding managers to approve hours before the payroll deadline is no small feat. If you’re handling your timesheets the old fashioned way, with punch cards or in spreadsheets, you’re well aware of this.   You shouldn’t have to work overtime trying to calculate hourly pay. Automated time tracking, when it syncs with your HRIS and payroll system, ensures that nonexempt workers get paid accurately and on time with minimal effort. Most solutions also have built-in reminders for payroll administrators, employees, and approvers when a deadline is approaching or action is needed. Additionally, you’ll be able to easily report on employee hours, identify trends, and catch runaway overtime before it hits your company’s bottom line. Try that with your old punch cards.   Need further convincing?  With the number of annual wage-and-hour lawsuits increasing by 330 percent , implementing time tracking software might just keep you on the right side of the law, too.   4. Capitalize on the Slow Days   While they’re always busy, payroll and tax professionals’ workloads can vary greatly from quarter to quarter. The end and beginning of the year are particular challenges, with W-2s, 1099s, and the Form 941 all due for filing. When “crunch time” is finally in the rear view mirror, the temptation to gear into autopilot is real. Don’t do it.   Rolling up your sleeves to take care of housekeeping items during slow periods can go a long way in achieving “instant” payroll. During these lulls (Q2 is a great example), take the time to audit employee personal information, confirm state tax rates, and log imputed income. If you know of any employees who have gone through  a significant life event , confirm whether they’d like to complete a new W-4. If you already work with a payroll service provider, some of these tasks will already be handled for you. Never leave it to doubt—develop a good rapport with your payroll vendor and don’t shy away from asking even basic questions.   We’ve put together a checklist of simple items you can take care of to ensure the rest of your year’s payroll runs smoothly.  You can read it here . Instant payroll doesn’t have to sound like an oxymoron. There are a number of ways you can streamline your processes today and take the hassle out of payroll processing.   Need a head start in your search? Namely processes over $7 billion in payroll annually for over 125,000 employees nationwide. To learn how our all-in-one technology and time tracking can make running payroll easier than ever,  schedule a free demo today . ..
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What does an HR person do all day? Every HR professional knows there’s no such thing as a “typical” day at work. In our  Day in the Life  series, we speak with pros from a variety of cities and industries to get a snapshot of their work lives.       Title:  People Operations Manager Company:   CareDash Location:  Cambridge, MA Industry:  Healthcare Tech Number of Employees:  30 HR Team Size:  2 Years of Experience:  2 years College Major:  Applied Psychology and Entrepreneurship Favorite Part of HR:  “I’m fascinated by the quasi-philosophical questions that arise from people management and HR. Questions like, “How do people understand value and seek recognition, and how does that impact performance management?” Or, “What is productivity and how can we enable people to be more impactful in their work?” There’s certainly a lot to unravel and learn!” At  CareDash , Dina Amouzigh works to keep a healthy balance between recruiting, HR administration, relationship management and project work. Her days often center around reactive tasks based on the needs that arise within her teams and employees’ lives.  One thing that makes it all worthwhile? CareDash’s employees are extremely tight-knit, making her day-to-day tasks smoother and more enjoyable overall. Here, she gives us a peek at an average day in her life: 9:15 a.m.:  I arrive in the office and start checking in with employees and my team. Flexible work hours are a great privilege. Then I grab my tea, respond to urgent emails, and start prioritizing my daily tasks. 10:00 a.m.:  I dedicate this time in the morning to responding to the rest of my emails. People email me frequently with questions about HR administrative issues such as expense reports, payroll, and IT needs. I also respond to candidate emails and incoming hires, and check in with our accountant or off-site employees. 11:00 a.m.:  Next I focus on making progress on my top priorities. Right now I’m planning three projects: Company-wide Bias Awareness Training, a new interview structure and training as we’re approaching recruiting season, and an HR FAQ info session. After I complete these projects I’ll be working on developing a two-week January Externship Program focusing on minorities in the tech industry and doing a deep dive into people analytics. 1:00 p.m.:  Lunch time! I try to always grab lunch with people at the office, that way I get to check in with them and see how they’re doing. I try to ask questions about their ongoing projects, or team-wide events, but I also try to know a little bit about everyone’s life outside of the office (as long as they’re open to sharing!). 1:30 p.m.:  I frequently find that by this time in the day, a reactive inquiry has come up. Today, that meant questions about performance evaluations, stock options, and troubleshooting WiFi issues. Those outlier tasks can sometimes take up a good amount of time, but I find these unplanned inquiries add a bit of variation to my day. 2:30 p.m.:  Every day I’m checking in with someone from at least one team—whether it’s a new manager who has an upcoming 1:1 for an unusual conversation or a manager whose new direct report just completed the 90-day mark. If I’m able, I try to schedule interviews for this block of time, or spend it looking over the candidate pipeline, ensuring we’re passing the right candidates, making sure I’m knowledgeable about everyone who has made it past our resume screening, or just making sure we’re getting enough candidates in. As a startup, it’s important to hire candidates that also truly believe in what we are working to accomplish—they need to be outgoing, driven, and willing to interact with colleagues they may not typically work with in a different environment. 3:30 p.m.:  Around this time every day, we have a fun, office-wide event that we call Stretch Time. This came about from our employees who wanted to improve their afternoon efficiency by breaking up the sometimes long period of time from lunch until the end of the day. Many of our employees also noted that they felt sore from exercising.(We have a very active office and employees love to take advantage of our office bikes for quick lunch-break rides!) So we created Stretch Time where for 10-15 minutes, we convene by the People’s Team desk area and do some stretching exercises. It’s a good way for people to take a much needed break, get energized, get their blood flowing, and build relationships with their peers. 3:45 p.m.:  I use this time to wrap up any pending priorities and tasks I’ve set out to accomplish or complete today. If I’m ahead of schedule, I use this time to sort through potential candidates and recruiting. 5:00p.m.:  Towards the end of the day, I check in with a few Slack HR Community channels that I’m part of, or I spend 15-30 minutes looking at blogs and researching best practices in the People Operations space. I try to stay knowledgeable about developments in the field and think about how to implement them at CareDash. Culture and employee happiness are a priority to us, and we’re always thinking about the many factors that impact our employee experience. ..
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